02 Enero - 2018

La historia de América en 2017, si sucedió en otro lado

En colombiaparatodo.net siempre hemos tenido la deferencia de publicar las informaciones de Ishaan Tharoor, empezando este año lo queremos hacer de nuevo.

La historia de América en 2017, si sucedió en otro lado
A daily newsletter that explores where the world meets Washington. Not on the list? Sign up here.
Today's WorldView
Edited by Max J. Rosenthal and Kazi Awal
By Ishaan Tharoor
Dear readers, this will be your last newsletter of 2017 as Today's WorldView takes a brief hiatus for the holidays. It has been a pleasure writing for you, and thanks to the many readers who have sent their feedback and kind words over the course of the year. Normal service shall resume in the first week of January, though I will return only on Jan. 8 (from my honeymoon!).
Best wishes for the holidays and happy new year, Ishaan.
The story of America in 2017, if it happened somewhere else
The leader likes to be praised. Close to the end of his first year in power, the presidential office circulated a memo that featured Cabinet ministers congratulating him on his efforts so far.
The foreign minister, who once allegedly called the leader a “moron,” now said he was taking the world into a new era of “strategic and economic cooperation.” The defense minister, who had struggled to check some of the leader's rash decisions, gave him “high marks” for fighting terrorists. The finance minister, mocked by the opposition as a consigliere for oligarchic power, applauded the leader for pushing through economic reforms that mostly line the pockets of the oligarchs.
It was the leader's deputy, though, who was most effusive with his praise.
“Thank you for seeing, through the course of this year, an agenda that truly is restoring this country,” he said. “I’m deeply humbled, as your vice president, to be able to be here.”
The leader probably needed this. He has had a tough year. He was spoiling for a fight on the day of his inauguration, delivering a short, dark address that warned of “carnage.” His war with the media escalated that very day, as the leader smarted over reports that crowds cheering his ascension were smaller than those that greeted his predecessor, an ethnic minority politician whom the leader loathed and had tried to smear as someone not truly from the country. The leader was probably sensitive about the fact that he had come to power despite the majority of the population having voted against him. Thanks to a political system codified hundreds of years ago, when some men in this country still owned others as property on the basis of their skin color, it all made sense. The leader somehow insisted (and keeps insisting) that the vote gave him a popular mandate that his predecessors, with far larger vote shares, never had. Ironically, though, his signature political achievement this year was a mammoth tax overhaul that gives huge rewards to the corporate firms and financial elites the leader once decried when seeking election. In reality, they represent another base of support for the leader, who, well before entering politics, was a scion of metropolitan privilege, the name behind a real estate empire and a television celebrity. There's still an ongoing investigation into connections his camp had with a foreign power, one that is thought to have meddled in his favor during the election. The leader profoundly resents this probe, especially as it rounded up some of his aides, and lashes out far more at his opponents at home than his counterpart overseas who apparently authorized the interference. Indeed, the leader has spent the past year being rather cozy with a series of strongmen abroad, while largely eschewing the traditional — if, at times, hypocritical — rhetoric of democracy and human rights invoked by his predecessors. His die-hard supporters, meanwhile, want to see a genuine purge of their supposed enemies in the civil bureaucracy, or what they call the “deep state.” Now, the leader has moved the presidential court to a winter residence far south of the capital that happens to be his own property. Known to bear grudges and bridle at criticism, he surrounds himself with his family. His daughter is a prominent adviser and spokeswoman for the regime; his son-in-law, a tycoon princeling who once mismanaged a small media house, serves as an envoy to kingdoms and republics elsewhere. His other children, when not seeking to expand the family's private estates on the back of their father's clout, launch public attacks on his opponents, questioning their patriotism.
The leader's loyalists have dabbled in some opportunistic schemes. At one stage this year, the brother of the education minister was promoting a surreal plan to outsource a war in a faraway land to mercenary companies under his watch. He hoped to pique the leader's interest by promising him access to vast mineral deposits beneath that nation's soil. More gravely, unearthed financial documents revealed the means by which a number of prominent advisers to the regime have avoided paying taxes on their vast wealth through offshore schemes. Although such revelations generated more outrage in other countries where such behavior is considered unpatriotic and unfair, few people batted an eyelid in the leader's country. It's a nation, after all, where many admire the gilded fortunes of people such as the leader, and shrug their shoulders at the widening inequality reshaping their society. Critics of the leader therefore see his “populism” largely as a sham, distinguished primarily by divisive rhetoric and policies. Even before entering office, the leader often signaled his antipathy for minority groups on the campaign trail. When a group of fringe neo-Nazis marched in a university town, his tepid response outraged many people, including some leading figures in his ruling party. His ubiquitous slogan — hailing nation “first” — taps into an earlier moment in the country's history when influential fascist sympathizers mobilized under the exact same banner. His supporters lambaste the phenomenon of “identity politics” in the country. But the most homogeneous group of voters in the country is that which supports the leader.
The leader says these people in the country's hinterlands were once “forgotten,” but no longer are. He is fixated on “restoring” his country to a mythic past, although it's unclear what that means for the future. Not long ago in the country, after all, most minority groups didn't have equal rights. He is obsessed about getting the rest of the world to “respect” his country's primacy again, but after a year of lashing out at allies and offering up churlish threats, he has presided over a marked slump in global attitudes toward his own nation. Undeterred, the leader wants to block immigration and build a vast wall along the country's southern border, though very few serious people believe it will make much of a difference. The leader's many opponents have wrung their hands over what to do about his time in power. Some are pushing for impeachment, shocked at how the leader has so brazenly attacked the norms of the republic and even now seems to be inching his country toward new, needless wars abroad. Others, gesturing to a phantom “resistance” movement, believe they can sweep out the leader's allies in upcoming legislative elections. They say the leader does not represent the nation's values, and is not “who we are.” But the leader still can count on significant, entrenched support. In his own party, there were quite a few figures who initially balked at his rise to power. But the vast majority are now sheltering beneath his banner. And so, as a divided nation heads toward a new year, both sides may have to accept that the tensions of the moment are no aberration but exactly a reflection of “who we are.”
(With apologies to Slate's Joshua Keating, who popularized this genre of online commentary quite some time ago.)
• The Trump administration presided over a showdown in the United Nations General Assembly after it threatened to cut aid from countries that voted against the U.S. on a resolution condemning Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. Earlier in the week, the U.S. vetoed a similar resolution that saw all 14 members of the Security Council — including traditional U.S. allies like France and Britain — vote for it. On Thursday, the non-binding resolution was overwhelmingly passed amid fears that Trump’s move undermines prospects for peace between Israelis and Palestinians. My colleagues have more: “Despite blunt warnings that U.S. aid to countries that backed the resolution and even funding for the United Nations itself may be cut, the resolution on ‘illegal Israeli actions in occupied East Jerusalem and the rest of occupied Palestinian territory’ got 128 votes. Only nine countries — including the United States and Israel — voted against it. Another 35 countries abstained, and 21 were absent…. The vote was a pointed rebuke not only to President Trump but also to a U.S. pressure campaign to sway votes by threatening to cut funding. Although Trump said Wednesday that he would be ‘watching’ for countries that receive a lot of U.S. aid and voted “against us,” the list of co-sponsors grew at the last minute to include Egypt and Jordan, the only two countries besides Israel that receive more than $1 billion in U.S. aid.” • More than 80 percent of Catalans turned out yesterday to send a pro-independence majority to the region's parliament. The election is being cast as a stark rebuke to Spain and Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, who dissolved the rebellious legislature two months ago, after it voted to secede from Spain. 
Unlike last time, many voters told our correspondent William Booth they felt more tired than excited. "It feels like Catalonia is totally broken,” Ines Corrales, 19, said. That might be because this new election creates more questions as it answers. It's unclear whether and how the new government will pursue independence, an issue that's plagued Catalonia for centuries. 
• My colleague Adam Taylor, along with The Post’s graphics department, put together an alarming end-of-the-year survey of what we’ve learned about North Korea’s nuclear weapons capabilities. Here’s a teaser, but see the piece itself for illustrative charts and maps: “In 2017, the North Korean weapons program stopped being funny. Instead, Pyongyang's persistent pursuit of ballistic missile and nuclear weapons technology led to serious talk about the risk of a devastating conflict between the United States and North Korea. This change wasn't due to a sudden surge in North Korean tests or a change in leader Kim Jong Un's stance. In fact, data collected by researchers show that the number of tests in 2017 is similar to the number last year, while the bellicose threats made against the United States and others are consistent. Building on decades of tests, North Korea has made remarkable technological gains in the past year, despite diplomatic and economic isolation. In the space of just a few months, Pyongyang conducted tests that showed it had boosted the range of its ballistic missiles and increased the yield of its nuclear weapons, as well as other more subtle advances that shocked outside observers.” • Vanity Fair, the New York City-based magazine, has a long profile on Stephen Bannon, a fellow whose name readers of Today’s WorldView are surely familiar with at this point. Though removed from the White House, the ultra-nationalist rabble rouser is hardly on the margins, conducting global speaking tours while currying support for far-right candidates in Republican elections. He played a conspicuous, shabby Rasputin to Trump’s emperor in the first half of 2017. But now, lifted from the shadows, does Bannon have greater designs on power?
A reporter, taking notes. (Photo by Max Bearak)
The Washington Post has bureaus scattered across the globe, home to reporters whose jurisdictions span continents and billions of people and the breadth of human experience beyond America’s borders. As 2017 ends, we asked correspondents in eleven of those bureaus – Tokyo, Beirut, Delhi, Brussels, Mexico City, London, Jerusalem, Berlin, Istanbul, Beijing and Moscow – to tell us about the most memorable or important stories they felt they wrote this year. What follows below is a sampling of their reflections. Their full accounts can be read here.
Anna Fifield, Tokyo bureau chief
In this year of alarming progress in North Korea’s nuclear weapons program and alarming talk about military options for dealing with it, I wanted to shine a spotlight on the people who know Kim Jong Un’s threats the best: the North Koreans living under his brutal reign every day. There are 25 million people who have to find ways to survive in Kim’s North Korea, however they can, and who are at constant risk of being sent to labor camps if they so much as question the leader. We talked to two dozen people who had lived in North Korea after Kim assumed power and had escaped, and then we let them recount their stories in their own words. I hope this helps the outside world to see North Koreans as human beings with feelings and dreams like the rest of us, and not as the brainwashed robots they are often portrayed to be.
[Kim Jong Un’s North Korea: Life inside the totalitarian state]
Louisa Loveluck, Beirut correspondent
Our investigation into the torture of prisoners inside Syria's military hospitals was the most haunting experience of my reporting career. I’d heard rumors of terrible goings on inside the facilities for years, including one particularly shocking account of a sick prisoner being executed in his hospital bed. It was the stuff of nightmares. So terrible that until I began to meet survivors, I had struggled to believe the stories were true.
[‘The hospitals were slaughterhouses’: A journey into Syria’s secret torture wards]
Josh Partlow, Mexico City bureau chief
When you get out onto Mexico’s lonely Highway 51 in the state of Guerrero, an area known as the Tierra Caliente — the Hot Lands — many strange things start happening. The temperature spikes drastically as you descend from the foothills down to the desert floor. You see bizarre landmarks, such as the giant head of former president Lázaro Cárdenas carved out of a boulder. And you discover, or at least I did, the horrifying degree to which heroin traffickers dominate the lives of some rural Mexicans. Photographer Michael Robinson Chavez and I found a level of lawlessness that I didn’t know still existed in Mexico.
[Violence is soaring in the Mexican towns that feed America's heroin habit]
William Booth, London bureau chief
My four years covering Israel and the Palestinians were drawing to a close — and the list of stories I wanted to report was as long as ever. I covered the 2014 war in the Gaza Strip, which was all action — and terrifying. But Gaza is mostly this strange, otherworldly place that just grinds on and on, isolated, trapped, its own little planet. So I wanted to tell the story of what it is like to be a young person in Gaza who does nothing all day. This isn't so easy. To write about nothing. But youth unemployment in Gaza is an unreal 60 percent.
[Trapped between Israel and Hamas, Gaza’s wasted generation is going nowhere]
David Filipov, Moscow bureau chief
My favorite story of the year came about as a result of an online argument about where the Ural Mountains end and where Siberia begins. It turned out that people in the Urals city of Yekaterinburg didn’t know. A producer at a local Internet TV station, fascinated that an American journalist was interested, invited me out, and we went looking together for this magical border.
[This Russian city says: ‘Don’t call us Siberia’]
Griff Witte, Berlin bureau chief
In a year of terrorist attacks, political upheaval and endless Brexit angst for Britain, the idea of a long-extinct wild cat making a dramatic comeback to the British Isles offered a welcome diversion. Brexit, I soon discovered, is not the only issue setting off fevered debate in the postcard-perfect British countryside.  
[The last British lynx was killed 1,300 years ago. Now the wild cat may be poised for a comeback.]
Un boletín diario que explora dónde el mundo se encuentra con Washington. No en la lista? Registrate aquí.
World View de hoy
Editado por Max J. Rosenthal y Kazi Awal
Por  Ishaan Tharoor
Estimados lectores, este será su último boletín informativo de 2017, ya que Today's WorldView toma un breve hiato para las vacaciones. Ha sido un placer escribir para usted y gracias a los muchos lectores que han enviado sus comentarios y amables palabras a lo largo del año. El servicio normal se reanudará en la primera semana de enero, aunque volveré solo el 8 de enero (¡desde mi luna de miel!).
Mis mejores deseos para las fiestas y feliz año nuevo, Ishaan.
La historia de América en 2017, si sucedió en otro lado
Al líder le gusta que lo elogien. Cerca del final de su primer año en el poder, la oficina presidencial circuló un memorando que mostraba a los ministros del gabinete felicitándolo por sus esfuerzos hasta el momento. El canciller, que una vez supuestamente calificó al líder como un "imbécil", ahora dijo que estaba llevando al mundo a una nueva era de "cooperación estratégica y económica". El ministro de Defensa, que había luchado para controlar algunas de las decisiones precipitadas del líder, le dio "altas calificaciones" por luchar contra los terroristas. El ministro de Finanzas, burlado por la oposición como un consigliere para el poder oligárquico, aplaudió al líder por empujar a través de las reformas económicas que en su mayoría se alinean en los bolsillos de los oligarcas.
Sin embargo, fue el diputado del líder quien fue más efusivo con sus elogios.
"Gracias por ver, a lo largo de este año, una agenda que realmente está restaurando este país", dijo. "Me siento profundamente honrado, como su vicepresidente, de poder estar aquí". El líder probablemente necesitaba esto. Él ha tenido un año difícil. Estaba ansioso por pelear el día de su toma de posesión, y pronunció un discurso corto y oscuro que advertía de "carnicería". Su guerra con los medios se intensificó ese mismo día, cuando el líder se enojó por los informes de que las multitudes animando su ascensión eran más pequeñas que aquellos que saludaron a su predecesor, un político de una minoría étnica a quien el líder detestaba y que había tratado de difamar como alguien que no era verdaderamente del país. El líder probablemente era sensible sobre el hecho de que había llegado al poder a pesar de que la mayoría de la población había votado en contra de él. Gracias a un sistema político codificado hace cientos de años, cuando algunos hombres en este país todavía poseían a otros como propiedad en función del color de su piel, todo tenía sentido. El líder de alguna manera insistió (y sigue insistiendo) en que el voto le dio un mandato popular que sus predecesores, con cuotas de voto mucho más grandes, nunca tuvieron. Irónicamente, sin embargo, su logro político distintivo este año fue una gigantesca revisión fiscal que otorga enormes recompensas a las empresas corporativas y las élites financieras que el líder alguna vez criticó cuando buscaba las elecciones. En realidad, representan otra base de apoyo para el líder, quien, mucho antes de ingresar a la política, era un heredero del privilegio metropolitano, el nombre detrás de un imperio inmobiliario y una celebridad de la televisión. Todavía hay una investigación en curso sobre las conexiones que su campamento tuvo con una potencia extranjera, una que se cree que se ha entrometido a su favor durante las elecciones. El líder se resiente profundamente de esta investigación, especialmente cuando reunió a algunos de sus ayudantes, y ataca mucho más a sus oponentes en casa que su contraparte en el exterior, quien aparentemente autorizó la interferencia. De hecho, el líder ha pasado el último año siendo bastante acogedor con una serie de hombres fuertes en el exterior, mientras evita en gran medida la retórica tradicional, si no hipócrita, de la democracia y los derechos humanos invocada por sus predecesores. Sus partidarios incondicionales, mientras tanto, quieren ver una purga genuina de sus supuestos enemigos en la burocracia civil, o lo que ellos llaman el "estado profundo". Ahora, el líder ha trasladado la corte presidencial a una residencia de invierno, al sur de la capital, que es propiedad suya. Conocido por guardar rencor y freno por las críticas, se rodea de su familia. Su hija es una destacada asesora y portavoz del régimen; su yerno, un principito de magnate que una vez manejó mal una pequeña casa de medios, sirve como enviado a reinos y repúblicas en otros lugares. Sus otros hijos, cuando no intentan expandir las propiedades privadas de la familia a causa de la influencia de su padre, lanzan ataques públicos contra sus oponentes, cuestionando su patriotismo. Los partidarios del líder han incursionado en algunos esquemas oportunistas. En una etapa de este año, el hermano del ministro de educación estaba promoviendo un plan surrealista para subcontratar una guerra en tierras lejanas a compañías mercenarias bajo su supervisión. Esperaba despertar el interés del líder prometiéndole acceso a vastos depósitos minerales debajo del suelo de esa nación. Más gravemente, los documentos financieros descubiertos revelaron los medios por los cuales varios asesores prominentes del régimen han evitado pagar impuestos sobre su vasta riqueza a través de esquemas en el exterior. Aunque tales revelaciones generaron más indignación en otros países donde tal comportamiento se considera antipatriota e injusto, pocas personas pestañearon en el país del líder. Después de todo, es una nación en la que muchos admiran las doradas fortunas de personas como el líder, y se encogen de hombros ante la creciente desigualdad que reestructura su sociedad. Por lo tanto, los críticos del líder ven su "populismo" en gran medida como una farsa, que se distingue principalmente por la retórica y las políticas divisivas. Incluso antes de entrar a la oficina, el líder a menudo señalaba su antipatía por los grupos minoritarios en la campaña electoral. Cuando un grupo de neonazis marginales marchó en una ciudad universitaria, su tibia respuesta indignó a mucha gente, incluidas algunas figuras destacadas de su partido gobernante. Su lema omnipresente, la nación que grita "primero", se nutre de un momento anterior en la historia del país cuando influyentes simpatizantes fascistas se movilizaron bajo la misma bandera. Sus seguidores critican el fenómeno de la "política de identidad" en el país. Pero el grupo más homogéneo de votantes en el país es el que apoya al líder. El líder dice que estas personas en el interior del país alguna vez fueron "olvidadas", pero ya no lo son. Está obsesionado con "restaurar" su país a un pasado mítico, aunque no está claro lo que eso significa para el futuro. No hace mucho tiempo en el país, después de todo, la mayoría de los grupos minoritarios no tenían los mismos derechos. Está obsesionado con conseguir que el resto del mundo "respete" de nuevo la primacía de su país, pero después de un año de arremeter contra los aliados y ofrecer amenazas groseras, ha presidido una marcada caída en las actitudes globales hacia su propia nación. Sin inmutarse, el líder quiere bloquear la inmigración y construir un vasto muro a lo largo de la frontera sur del país, aunque muy pocas personas serias creen que hará una gran diferencia. Los muchos oponentes del líder se han abatido sobre qué hacer con respecto a su tiempo en el poder. Algunos están presionando para que se les impugne, sorprendido de cómo el líder ha atacado tan descaradamente las normas de la República e incluso ahora parece estar incomodando a su país hacia guerras nuevas e innecesarias en el exterior. Otros, gesticulando hacia un movimiento fantasma de "resistencia", creen que pueden barrer a los aliados del líder en las próximas elecciones legislativas. Dicen que el líder no representa los valores de la nación, y no es "quiénes somos". Pero el líder aún puede contar con un apoyo significativo y arraigado. En su propio partido, hubo bastantes figuras que inicialmente se opusieron a su ascenso al poder. Pero la gran mayoría ahora se refugia debajo de su estandarte. Y así, cuando una nación dividida se dirige hacia un nuevo año, ambas partes pueden tener que aceptar que las tensiones del momento no son una aberración, sino exactamente un reflejo de "quiénes somos". (Con disculpas a Joshua Keating de Slate, quien popularizó este género de comentarios en línea hace bastante tiempo).
• La administración Trump presidió un enfrentamiento en la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas después de que amenazó con suspender la ayuda de los países que votaron en contra de los EE. UU. En una resolución que condena la decisión de Trump de reconocer a Jerusalén como la capital de Israel. A principios de la semana, Estados Unidos vetó una resolución similar que vio a los 14 miembros del Consejo de Seguridad, incluidos los aliados tradicionales de Estados Unidos como Francia y Gran Bretaña, votar a favor. El jueves, la resolución no vinculante fue abrumadoramente aprobada en medio de temores de que el movimiento de Trump socave las perspectivas de paz entre israelíes y palestinos. Mis colegas tienen más:
"A pesar de las advertencias contundentes de que la ayuda estadounidense a los países que respaldaron la resolución e incluso el financiamiento de las propias Naciones Unidas podría reducirse, la resolución sobre 'acciones ilegales israelíes en Jerusalén Oriental ocupada y el resto del territorio palestino ocupado' obtuvo 128 votos. Solo nueve países, incluidos Estados Unidos e Israel, votaron en contra. Otros 35 países se abstuvieron y 21 estuvieron ausentes ...
La votación fue una reprimenda dirigida no solo al presidente Trump, sino también a una campaña de presión de los EE. UU. Para influir en los votos al amenazar con recortar los fondos. Aunque Trump dijo el miércoles que estaría "vigilando" a los países que reciben mucha ayuda estadounidense y votó "en contra de nosotros", la lista de copatrocinadores creció en el último momento para incluir a Egipto y Jordania, los únicos dos países además de Israel. que reciben más de $ 1 mil millones en ayuda de los Estados Unidos ". Eso podría ser porque esta nueva elección crea más preguntas a medida que responde. No está claro si el nuevo gobierno buscará la independencia y cómo lo hará, un problema que ha plagado a Cataluña durante siglos.
• Mi colega Adam Taylor, junto con el departamento de gráficos de The Post, preparó una alarmante encuesta de fin de año sobre lo que hemos aprendido sobre las capacidades de armas nucleares de Corea del Norte. Aquí hay un adelanto, pero vea la pieza misma para gráficos y mapas ilustrativos: "En 2017, el programa de armas de Corea del Norte dejó de ser divertido. En cambio, la búsqueda persistente de Pyongyang de la tecnología de armas nucleares y misiles balísticos llevó a una conversación seria sobre el riesgo de un conflicto devastador entre los Estados Unidos y Corea del Norte. Este cambio no se debió a un aumento repentino en las pruebas de Corea del Norte o un cambio en la postura del líder Kim Jong Un. De hecho, los datos recopilados por los investigadores muestran que el número de pruebas en 2017 es similar al número del año pasado, mientras que las amenazas belicosas contra los Estados Unidos y otros son consistentes. Sobre la base de décadas de pruebas, Corea del Norte ha logrado notables avances tecnológicos en el último año, a pesar del aislamiento diplomático y económico. En tan solo unos meses, Pyongyang realizó pruebas que demostraron que había aumentado el alcance de sus misiles balísticos y aumentado el rendimiento de sus armas nucleares, así como otros avances más sutiles que sorprendieron a los observadores externos ". • Vanity Fair, la revista con sede en la ciudad de Nueva York, tiene un perfil extenso sobre Stephen Bannon, un hombre cuyos nombres los lectores de Today's WorldView seguramente conocen en este momento. Aunque fue destituido de la Casa Blanca, el fanático de la chusma ultranacionalista apenas se encuentra en los márgenes, realizando giras de conferencias globales mientras busca el apoyo de los candidatos de extrema derecha en las elecciones republicanas. Jugó un Rasputín conspicuo y cutre al emperador de Trump en la primera mitad de 2017. Pero ahora, levantado de las sombras, ¿tiene Bannon mayores diseños de poder?
Un reportero, tomando notas. (Foto de Max Bearak)
The Washington Post tiene oficinas repartidas por todo el mundo, hogar de reporteros cuyas jurisdicciones abarcan continentes y miles de millones de personas y la amplitud de la experiencia humana más allá de las fronteras de Estados Unidos. A finales de 2017, pedimos corresponsales en once de esas oficinas: Tokio, Beirut, Delhi, Bruselas, Ciudad de México, Londres, Jerusalén, Berlín, Estambul, Pekín y Moscú, para contarnos sobre las historias más importantes o memorables que sintieron que escribieron este año. Lo que sigue a continuación es una muestra de sus reflexiones. Sus cuentas completas se pueden leer aquí. (Con disculpas a Joshua Keating de Slate, quien popularizó este género de comentarios en línea hace bastante tiempo). • La administración Trump presidió un enfrentamiento en la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas después de que amenazó con suspender la ayuda de los países que votaron en contra de los EE. UU. En una resolución que condena la decisión de Trump de reconocer a Jerusalén como la capital de Israel. A principios de la semana, Estados Unidos vetó una resolución similar que vio a los 14 miembros del Consejo de Seguridad, incluidos los aliados tradicionales de Estados Unidos como Francia y Gran Bretaña, votar a favor. El jueves, la resolución no vinculante fue abrumadoramente aprobada en medio de temores de que el movimiento de Trump socave las perspectivas de paz entre israelíes y palestinos. Mis colegas tienen más: "A pesar de las advertencias contundentes de que la ayuda estadounidense a los países que respaldaron la resolución e incluso el financiamiento de las propias Naciones Unidas podría reducirse, la resolución sobre 'acciones ilegales israelíes en Jerusalén Oriental ocupada y el resto del territorio palestino ocupado' obtuvo 128 votos. Solo nueve países, incluidos Estados Unidos e Israel, votaron en contra. Otros 35 países se abstuvieron y 21 estuvieron ausentes ... La votación fue una reprimenda dirigida no solo al presidente Trump, sino también a una campaña de presión de los EE. UU. Para influir en los votos al amenazar con recortar los fondos. Aunque Trump dijo el miércoles que estaría "vigilando" a los países que reciben mucha ayuda estadounidense y votó "en contra de nosotros", la lista de copatrocinadores creció en el último momento para incluir a Egipto y Jordania, los únicos dos países además de Israel. que reciben más de $ 1 mil millones en ayuda de los Estados Unidos ".
• Más del 80 por ciento de los catalanes acudieron ayer para enviar una mayoría independentista al parlamento de la región. Las elecciones se emiten como un severo reproche a España y al primer ministro Mariano Rajoy, quien disolvió la legislatura rebelde hace dos meses, después de que votó a favor de separarse de España. A diferencia de la última vez, muchos votantes le dijeron a nuestro corresponsal William Booth que se sentían más cansados ​​que emocionados. "Parece que Cataluña está totalmente rota", dijo Ines Corrales, de 19 años.
Eso podría ser porque esta nueva elección crea más preguntas a medida que responde. No está claro si el nuevo gobierno buscará la independencia y cómo lo hará, un problema que ha plagado a Cataluña durante siglos.
• Mi colega Adam Taylor, junto con el departamento de gráficos de The Post, preparó una alarmante encuesta de fin de año sobre lo que hemos aprendido sobre las capacidades de armas nucleares de Corea del Norte. Aquí hay un adelanto, pero vea la pieza misma para gráficos y mapas ilustrativos:
"En 2017, el programa de armas de Corea del Norte dejó de ser divertido. En cambio, la búsqueda persistente de Pyongyang de la tecnología de armas nucleares y misiles balísticos llevó a una conversación seria sobre el riesgo de un conflicto devastador entre los Estados Unidos y Corea del Norte. Este cambio no se debió a un aumento repentino en las pruebas de Corea del Norte o un cambio en la postura del líder Kim Jong Un. De hecho, los datos recopilados por los investigadores muestran que el número de pruebas en 2017 es similar al número del año pasado, mientras que las amenazas belicosas contra los Estados Unidos y otros son consistentes. Sobre la base de décadas de pruebas, Corea del Norte ha logrado notables avances tecnológicos en el último año, a pesar del aislamiento diplomático y económico. En tan solo unos meses, Pyongyang realizó pruebas que demostraron que había aumentado el alcance de sus misiles balísticos y aumentado el rendimiento de sus armas nucleares, así como otros avances más sutiles que sorprendieron a los observadores externos ". • Vanity Fair, la revista con sede en la ciudad de Nueva York, tiene un perfil extenso sobre Stephen Bannon, un hombre cuyos nombres los lectores de Today's WorldView seguramente conocen en este momento. Aunque fue destituido de la Casa Blanca, el fanático de la chusma ultranacionalista apenas se encuentra en los márgenes, realizando giras de conferencias globales mientras busca el apoyo de los candidatos de extrema derecha en las elecciones republicanas. Jugó un Rasputín conspicuo y cutre al emperador de Trump en la primera mitad de 2017. Pero ahora, levantado de las sombras, ¿tiene Bannon mayores diseños de poder?
Un reportero, tomando notas. (Foto de Max Bearak)
The Washington Post tiene oficinas repartidas por todo el mundo, hogar de reporteros cuyas jurisdicciones abarcan continentes y miles de millones de personas y la amplitud de la experiencia humana más allá de las fronteras de Estados Unidos. A finales de 2017, pedimos corresponsales en once de esas oficinas: Tokio, Beirut, Delhi, Bruselas, Ciudad de México, Londres, Jerusalén, Berlín, Estambul, Pekín y Moscú, para contarnos sobre las historias más importantes o memorables que sintieron que escribieron este año. Lo que sigue a continuación es una muestra de sus reflexiones. Sus cuentas completas se pueden leer aquí.
Anna Fifield, jefe de la oficina de Tokio
En este año de alarmante progreso en el programa de armas nucleares de Corea del Norte y alarmantes conversaciones sobre opciones militares para enfrentarlo, quería centrar la atención en las personas que conocen mejor las amenazas de Kim Jong Un: los norcoreanos viven bajo su brutal reinado cada día. Hay 25 millones de personas que deben encontrar formas de sobrevivir en la Corea del Norte de Kim, como sea que puedan hacerlo, y que corren el riesgo constante de ser enviadas a campos de trabajos forzados si aún cuestionan al líder. Hablamos con dos docenas de personas que habían vivido en Corea del Norte después de que Kim asumió el poder y escapó, y luego les permitimos contar sus historias con sus propias palabras. Espero que esto ayude al mundo exterior a ver a los norcoreanos como seres humanos con sentimientos y sueños como el resto de nosotros, y no como los robots con lavado de cerebro que a menudo se les representa.
[Corea del Norte de Kim Jong Un: vida dentro del estado totalitario]
Louisa Loveluck, corresponsal de Beirut
Nuestra investigación sobre la tortura de prisioneros dentro de los hospitales militares de Siria fue la experiencia más inquietante de mi carrera como periodista. Había escuchado rumores de cosas terribles en el interior de las instalaciones durante años, incluido un relato particularmente impactante de un preso enfermo ejecutado en su cama de hospital. Fue el tema de las pesadillas. Tan terrible que hasta que comencé a conocer a los sobrevivientes, había luchado por creer que las historias eran ciertas.
['Los hospitales fueron mataderos': un viaje a las salas de torturas secretas de Siria]
Josh Partlow, jefe de la oficina de la Ciudad de México
Cuando sales a la solitaria autopista 51 de México en el estado de Guerrero, un área conocida como Tierra Caliente, las Tierras Calientes, muchas cosas extrañas comienzan a suceder. La temperatura aumenta drásticamente a medida que desciendes desde las estribaciones hasta el suelo del desierto. Ves hitos extraños, como la cabeza gigante del ex presidente Lázaro Cárdenas tallada en una roca. Y descubres, o al menos yo lo hice, el horrible grado en que los traficantes de heroína dominan las vidas de algunos mexicanos de las zonas rurales. El fotógrafo Michael Robinson Chávez y yo encontramos un nivel de anarquía que aún no sabía que existía en México.
[La violencia aumenta en las ciudades mexicanas que alimentan el hábito heroico de Estados Unidos]
William Booth, jefe de la oficina de Londres
Mis cuatro años cubriendo Israel y los palestinos estaban llegando a su fin, y la lista de historias que quería informar fue más larga que nunca. Cubrí la guerra de 2014 en la Franja de Gaza, que fue todo acción, y aterradora. Pero Gaza es sobre todo este lugar extraño, de otro mundo que simplemente sigue y sigue, aislado, atrapado, su propio pequeño planeta. Así que quería contar la historia de cómo es ser un joven en Gaza que no hace nada en todo el día. Esto no es tan fácil. Para escribir sobre nada Pero el desempleo juvenil en Gaza es un 60 por ciento irreal.
[Atrapada entre Israel y Hamas, la generación desperdiciada de Gaza no va a ninguna parte]
David Filipov, jefe de la oficina de Moscú
Mi historia favorita del año surgió como resultado de un debate en línea sobre dónde terminan los montes Urales y dónde comienza Siberia. Resultó que las personas en la ciudad de Ekaterimburgo no sabían. Un productor en una estación local de televisión por Internet, fascinado de que un periodista estadounidense estuviera interesado, me invitó a salir y fuimos juntos a buscar este borde mágico.
[Esta ciudad rusa dice: 'No nos llamen Siberia']
Griff Witte, jefe de la oficina de Berlín
En un año de ataques terroristas, agitación política e interminable angustia de Brexit por Gran Bretaña, la idea de un gato salvaje hace mucho tiempo extinto haciendo un dramático regreso a las Islas Británicas ofreció una bienvenida diversión. Brexit, pronto lo descubrí, no es el único tema que desencadena un debate enfebrecido en el campo británico perfecto para las postales.
[El último lince británico fue asesinado hace 1.300 años. Ahora el gato salvaje puede estar listo para un regreso.]